Social war by any other name

In general, I prefer not to reproduce stories that are tales of capture, but a lot of activities are invisible until someone gets caught.

This morning I read of two shops whose owners were operating beyond the law. At one, restaurant owners reported their capital stolen, collected insurance money, and then used that capital to open up another restaurant. At another, a restaurant owner was selling marijuana straight out of his shop.

Incidents like these make me contemplate agorist theory and its intersections with anarchism -- more importantly, the bits and pieces that can be culled from agorism in shaping insurrectionary strategy. At the very least, this means taking a second look at hardline Marxist class theory and considering all the agents that have a stake in the abolition of the state (and, for that matter, in defending it). Even the Greek anarchists were willing to support a kiosk owner hit by recent riots, and if that doesn't rile dogmatic classism I don't know what will.

This does not mean those of us who are workers should be forgetting where the balance of class power lies, however, as everyday work experiences remind us.

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